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Healthy Cells is a local health magazine with most of the articles written by local professionals. People love to read about healthcare from their local health professionals. Each month includes a wide variety of articles on various topics.
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Xylitol: Danger, Paws Off

Your six-month-old puppy, Hoover, will eat anything that isn’t tied down. Like many dog owners, you know chocolate can be dangerous to your pooch. But you may not know that if Hoover sticks his nose in your purse and eats a pack of sugarless chewing gum, the consequences could be deadly.
    Sugarless gum may contain xylitol, a class of sweetener known as sugar alcohol. Xylitol is present in many products and foods for human use, but can have devastating effects on your pet. You may have seen recent news stories about dogs that have died or become very ill after eating products containing xylitol.



Other foods that contain xylitol
    Gum isn’t the only product containing xylitol. Slightly lower in calories than sugar, this sugar substitute is also often used to sweeten sugar-free candy, such as mints and chocolate bars. Other products that may contain xylitol include the following products:
• Breath mints
• Baked goods
• Cough syrup
• Children’s and adult chewable vitamins
• Mouthwash
• Toothpaste

Why is xylitol dangerous to dogs, but not people?
    In both people and dogs, the level of blood sugar is controlled by the release of insulin from the pancreas. In people, xylitol does not stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. However, it’s different in canines: When dogs eat something containing xylitol, the xylitol is more quickly absorbed into the bloodstream, and may result in a potent release of insulin from the pancreas.
    This rapid release of insulin may result in a rapid and profound decrease in the level of blood sugar (hypoglycemia), an effect that can occur within 10 to 60 minutes of eating the xylitol. Untreated, this hypoglycemia can quickly be life-threatening.


Symptoms
    Symptoms of xylitol poisoning in dogs include vomiting, followed by symptoms associated with the sudden lowering of your dog’s blood sugar, such as decreased activity, weakness, staggering, incoordination, collapse, and seizures.
    If you think your dog has eaten xylitol, take him to your vet or an emergency animal hospital immediately. Because hypoglycemia and other serious adverse effects may not occur in some cases for up to 12 to 24 hours, your dog may need to be monitored.
    The toxicity of xylitol for cats has not been documented. They appear to be spared, at least in part, by their disdain for sweets.

What can you do to avoid xylitol poisoning in your dog?
    If you’re concerned about your dog eating a food or product with xylitol in it, check the label of ingredients. If it does, indeed, say that it contains xylitol, make sure your pet can’t get to it. In addition…
• Keep products that contain xylitol (including those you don’t think of as food, such as toothpaste) well out of your dog’s reach. Remember that some dogs are adept at counter surfing.
• Only use pet toothpaste for pets, never human toothpaste.
• If you give your dog nut butter as a treat or as a vehicle for pills, check the label first to make sure it doesn’t contain xylitol.

    Nilla’s Tub DIY Dog Wash and Health Food Store for Dogs and Cats, located at 211 Landmark Dr. in Normal, carries a full line of products from Honest Kitchen. In addition to their large selection of dietary supplements, treats, and quality food including raw, dehydrated raw, canned, and kibble, they have everything you need to bathe and groom your furry friend in a fun, relaxing environment. No appointment necessary, call 309-451-9274 or visit them online at NillasTub.com.

 

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